CRW over Rotto

There seems to be a bit of interest in the Japanese demo jump, so here is another one to feed the curiosity!!

As mentioned previously, we did demos into Rottnest for about 10 years every March long weekend.

On this jump we build what is called a Quadraplane by stacking the canopies on top of each other. One year we actually landed a Triplane!!

This photo was taken by my favorite camera man, Stan Morris!

I am on the bottom with the pink canopy…and don’t start any pink jokes!!

CRW stands for Canopy Relative Work.
I thought I would also post a shot of us landing a 3 stack…I used to be 6’1″ before this jump…the guy on the bottom always gets thumped in :)!!!

Stack
S022

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~ by True North Mark on August 21, 2009.

5 Responses to “CRW over Rotto”

  1. Just another day at the office eh Mark! Looks brilliant ๐Ÿ˜€

    How do you actually ‘stack’ in the air without getting the chutes tangled and how is the stack kept locked so to speak, there seems to be little platforms the jumpers stand on?

    • Hi Bo!

      The way it is done is a pin and base is set up, meaning that the base man is the top guy and the pin sets up above him and pulls down on the front risers. This positions him lower than the base but with a little speed. The pin then guides the canopy to the feet of the base. The base then catches the canopy with his feet and locks them into the centre lines. At this point the pin then pulls down on the brake toggles which gives the canopy lift. The base guy slides down the lines and then hooks his feet into some stirrups. Stirrups are just some line tied between the fwd and rear line groups and by hooking his feet into the stirrups means that there is no chance of sliding back up the lines and collapsing the pins canopy.

      Once the pin and base are together, the process is repeated one by one until you have the stack complete. If done with good experienced guys it is safe enough and great fun, but it can get nasty if someone crashes into the stack with speed, so CRW learners are kept in twos until they prove they have enough control to do a stack.

      I was in a 12 way stack one day, but don’t have a picture of that unfortunately!!!

      • Sounds like that takes a bit of practice to nail perfectly, especially with 12 in a stack!

      • Yes Bo for sure!

        Whilst trying to build the 12 stack I had 2 guys get tangled above me and they came plummeting through my canopy…all at about 10,000 ft so we had heaps of time to sort it out.

        The result was that my mate Irish and I had to cut away and use our reserves….bit of an adrenalin overload that day!!

        I used to like CRW though. It is a really cool part of the sport that is not done much these days due to the canopies that are used. The modern day canopy is much faster and not conducive to CRW.

        What tends to happen more now is canopy swooping. These guys are often on 90 square foot parachutes and they swoop them close to the ground and get a surface effect thing happening and end up swooping about 2-300 m across the ground before they flare and land.

        Look great, but when they stuff up the results are not good!! There is a lot of speed involved near hard surfaces….speed plus hard surfaces and impact amount to breaks…and a few of them!!

        You know the old theory…ever action has an equal and opposite reaction…very true for canopy swopping let me tell you!!

        Cheers,

        Mark

      • Sounds like an interesting jump!!! lets not do that canopy swooping on my first jump eh, let’s wait till say the 2nd jump ๐Ÿ˜€

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